CBD Glossary

—A—

2-AG

The most abundant endocannabinoid found in the body, 2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is a member of a group of molecules that play a complex and important role in various bodily processes including immunity and inflammation. Like anandamide, 2-AG is thought to help regulate appetite, immune system function, and pain management by interacting with the body’s endocannabinoid system receptors.

Alcohol extraction 

A method commonly used to extract cannabinoids from cannabis plants. In this process, cannabis is first soaked in an alcohol, such as ethanol, to remove the plant material. The alcohol is removed through evaporation.

Aeroponics 

A cultivation technique in which plants are grown in an environment dependent on air rather than soil. In this system, seeds are embedded in foam stuffed into tiny pots that hold the stem and root mass in place. Plants are nurtured with light and a fine mist enriched with nutrients.

Anandamide

A major endocannabinoid  naturally found in the body. Like 2-AG, anandamide is part of the body’s endocannabinoid system and alters functions like cognition, learning, memory, mood, other higher intellectual functions, and certain motor functions. THC is thought to produce psychoactive effects and alter these same functions in the body because it mimics the way anandamide interacts with the endocannabinoid system. 

—B—

Bioavailability

This term refers to the degree and rate at which a drug is absorbed by the body’s circulatory system. It’s an important measurement tool because it determines the correct dosage for non-intravenously administered drugs. For drugs, supplements, and herbs administered non-intravenously (such as through consumption, inhalation, or topical application) bioavailability designates the fraction of the ingested dose that eventually gets absorbed.

Broad spectrum

Products labeled “broad spectrum” fall somewhere between full-spectrum and isolate formulations. Because they contain terpenes and other beneficial cannabinoids, broad-spectrum products offer some of the benefits of the entourage effect — without any THC. For those who can’t have or don’t want to have any traces of THC in their system, broad-spectrum products can be a better choice than isolates. But they’re not as effective as full-spectrum products.

—C—

Cannabidiol

Also known as CBD, cannabidiol is one of the naturally occurring cannabinoids found in cannabis plants. It’s the second most prevalent active ingredient in cannabis, accounting for up to 40% of the plant’s extract. CBD does not produce psychoactive effects. Cannabidiol interacts with the endocannabinoid system (ECS), part of the nervous system that’s thought to play a regulatory role in all kinds of bodily functions, including mood, sleep, and appetite. According to a 2017 report from the World Health Organization, there is evidence that CBD is an effective treatment for epilepsy.

Cannabichromene (CBC) 

One of 120 cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant. CBC is a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, meaning it does not cause feelings of being high.

Cannabidiol (CBD) 

The second most prevalent cannabinoid in cannabis, after tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabidiol has been shown to calm the movements in people suffering from dystonia, a condition characterized by muscle spasms. Research also suggests that it may be helpful for the treatment of anxiety, movement disorders, and pain.

Cannabinoid

Not to be confused with cannabidiol (cannabidiol is a cannabinoid, but not all cannabinoids are cannabidiol), a cannabinoid is one of the diverse chemical compounds that acts on the endocannabinoid system receptors found throughout the body. These molecules include the endocannabinoids produced naturally in the body and phytocannabinoids from cannabis. The two most notable cannabinoids are THC and CBD.

Cannabis sativa

Indigenous to eastern Asia, this flowering herbaceous plant has been farmed throughout recorded human history. It is farmed for marijuana as well as the industrial hemp used in CBD products. In addition, hemp fiber, hemp seed oil, and food products are also derived and harvested from different parts of the plant.

Cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor 

CB1 receptors are found on the surface of certain cells, tissues, and organs, and help regulate biological function. CB1 receptors are present in several regions of the brain and spinal cord and, in lesser quantities, in other parts of the body, such as the endocrine glands and the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts. CB1 receptors mediate the effects of cannabinoids on these organs.

Cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptor 

CB2 receptors regulate the biological function of certain cells, tissues, and organs. CB2 receptors are present on white blood cells and in the tonsils, the spleen, immune cells, and neurons. CB2 receptors help mediate the effect of cannabinoids on these organs and cells.

Cannabinoid 

profile The concentration of active cannabinoids in a product or medication.

Cannabinol A crystalline, mildly psychoactive cannabinoid found in small quantities in cannabis. Cannabinol is a breakdown product of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that may have a sedating effect.

Cannabis 

Cannabis refers to a group of three varieties of marijuana plants with psychoactive properties: Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica, and Cannabis ruderalis. Cannabis contains more than 120 chemical and biologically active components, known as cannabinoids.

Cannabis indica 

A strain of cannabis known for higher concentrations of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Also called indica, it is known for its sedative effects. Because indica contains higher concentrations of THC, it is popular as a recreational and medicinal drug.

Cannabis sativa 

A strain of cannabis known for promoting a cerebral high. Also known as sativa, it has hallucinogenic, hypnotic, sedative, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory effects.

Clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CECD)

The theory that insufficient levels of endocannabinoids can lead to ailments, such as migraine, fibromyalgia, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Closed-loop extraction 

An extraction method in which solvents aren’t exposed to the open air. Used in the past to produce perfume and beauty products, the process has been used more recently to create cannabis concentrates.

Concentrates (or extracts)

Cannabis concentrates, or extracts, are significantly more potent than a standard cannabis bud or flower. They are processed to keep only the most desirable medicinal compounds while removing excess plant material. Concentrates are often developed for medical applications.

Cultivator 

An individual who grows marijuana plants, usually with a focus on soil quality and plant health.

Cure A process used to preserve the cannabis plant and retain its flavors and therapeutic properties. Curing involves removing moisture from the flowers under controlled environmental conditions.

Capsule

A delivery method for CBD oils and extracts that’s easy to swallow (literally). Capsule products resemble the gel pills you’re used to seeing at your local pharmacy.

CBD

Cannabidiol’s popular nickname. You’ll see CBD attached to many products, but not all are created equal.

Certificate of analysis

A document from an accredited laboratory certifying the amount of cannabinoids in a given product. This proof of analysis exists to benefit the consumer as much as the producer: It guarantees quality assurance for both parties. Reviewing the COA is a pro consumer move that helps you avoid mislabeled, low-quality, or fake products. A reputable company will always provide one.

CO2 extraction

The carbon-dioxide extraction process uses changes in temperature and pressure to create phase changes in carbon dioxide, gently drawing out the plant’s beneficial components. The result is clean, safe oil with a long shelf life.

—D—

Dabs and dabbing 

Dabs are concentrated doses of cannabis that are made by extracting tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or CBD using a solvent like butane; the resulting sticky oils are sometimes referred to as wax. Dabbing is the flash vaporization and inhalation of these concentrates. CBD dabbing is noted for its quick therapeutic effects.

Decarboxylation 

The process of applying heat to activate and release the CBD and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in cannabis.

Delivery method

How a drug enters the body in order to produce the desired therapeutic effects. The delivery method of a given drug can affect how quickly it starts working and how much of each dose gets absorbed by the body (bioavailability). CBD delivery methods include ingestible capsules, gummies, and tinctures, as well as topical lotionssalves and lip balms.

Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol

Known by the abbreviation THC, this is a primary cannabinoid found in cannabis and the one responsible for its psychoactive effects. It works on endocannabinoid receptors in the brain to release dopamine. Some dislike the “high” feeling or other side effects of this chemical and prefer hemp-based products that contain very little to no THC.

Dispensary 

Medical cannabis dispensaries are designed to give people a secure location to gather information and purchase cannabis grown to treat ailments. Laws regarding access vary by state.

Dosing 

The quantity of medicine prescribed at one time. Dosing CBD depends on therapeutic goals, as well as how it is ingested or applied.

Dronabinol (Marinol and Syndros) 

Dronabinol is a man-made form of a natural substance in marijuana, and it is often used to treat loss of appetite and weight loss in people with cancer or HIV infection. Marinol and Syndros are common brand names of dronabinol.

—E—

Edible

Any food containing some form of cannabis. Pot brownies are the most classic example, but nowadays, cannabis-infused edibles come in many other forms: candy, coffee, baked goods, martinis, even infused butter and cooking oil.

Endocannabinoids (endogenous lipid-based retrograde neurotransmitters)

Natural chemicals produced by your body that interact with your endocannabinoid system and regulate important body functions. Their purpose is to maintain homeostasis. So far, two have been identified: anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG).

Endocannabinoid enhancer

A drug that enhances the activity of the endocannabinoid system.

Endocannabinoid enzymes Proteins that your body makes to break down endocannabinoids that have fulfilled their purpose. The two main endocannabinoid enzymes are: fatty acid amidohydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). 

Endocannabinoid receptors

Special receptors that endocannabinoids bind to as a way of signaling that the endocannabinoid system needs to act. They’re found throughout your body and can interact with the chemical compounds in cannabis. There are two types of receptors: B1 receptors and CB2 receptors.

Endocannabinoid reuptake inhibitor

A drug that limits the reabsorption of endocannabinoid neurotransmitters by the releasing neuron.

Endocannabinoid system (ECS) 

A complex system within the human body that affects many important functions, including how a person moves, feels, and reacts. It includes endocannabinoids, endocannabinoid receptors, and endocannabinoid enzymes.

Endocannabinoid system

Also known as the ECS, the main function of this mammalian system is to maintain bodily homeostasis, or keeping the body balanced even when the environment changes. Scientists believe that cannabis is effective, in part, because the phytocannabinoids it contains mimic our endocannabinoids. Endocannabinoid receptors are found throughout the entire body, and the system plays a part in many of the body’s processes, including appetite, stress, sleep, pain, memory, and immune function.

Entourage effect

This phenomenon is all about teamwork: It’s the result of the many components in the cannabis plant interacting together with the human body to produce a stronger effect than any one component on its own. Full-spectrum CBD products combine CBD with other naturally occurring terpenes and cannabinoids (including THC) to be more effective than their isolate counterparts.

Ethanol extraction

Extraction using cold, high-grade alcohol gently pulls all the active compounds from the cannabis plant’s cellulose material, resulting in pure, full-spectrum hemp oil. Oils extracted using this method are further refined via chromatography to remove all remaining traces of ethanol.

Extraction

The process of deriving CBD oil from hemp. There are several methods of extracting CBD from cannabis plants, including CO2 and cold ethanol extraction.

—F—

Farm Bill

United States Congress voted at the end of December 2018 to pass the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018, more commonly referred to as the Farm Bill. This legislation made CBD products legal to purchase in all 50 states. Under the Farm Bill, industrial hemp (where CBD products are derived from) must contain less than .3 % THC. The power over industrial hemp regulation is shared by the state and federal governments. The Farm Bill also gave the FDA the authority to regulate cannabis products.

FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a regulatory government agency with the power to regulate cannabis and cannabis-derived products since the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill. So far, the FDA has officially approved the CBD product Epidiolex as a treatment for epilepsy. The government’s relationship with the cannabis industry is constantly evolving; learn more about about how the FDA is handling cannabis and CBD products on the FDA’s website.

Flower 

The smokable portion of the female cannabis plant.

Full spectrum

CBD that’s full of all the terpenes, cannabinoids, flavonoids, and fatty acids found in hemp, all of which have therapeutic value of their own and help create what’s known as the entourage effect. Basically, full-spectrum CBD can give you every potential benefit the plant has to offer.

—H—

Hemp

A distinct strain of the Cannabis sativa plant often grown for industrial use. Hemp used in CBD products must contain less than .3% THC.

Hemp seed oil

Derived from industrial hemp, hemp seed oil is created by pressing the plant’s seeds. It has no therapeutic benefits but is often used as a dietary supplement and a low-saturated-fat cooking oil.

Homeostasis

A term that describes the dynamic stability of your internal environment.

Homogeneity 

This refers to testing to ensure the genetic consistency across strains of cannabis, or to the even distribution of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or CBD in a product, such as an edible.

Hybrid 

A strain that mixes two varieties of cannabis, indica and sativa.

Hydroponics 

The method of growing a plant without soil. Sand, gravel, water, and other materials may take the place of dirt.

—I—

Industrial hemp

Hemp grown specifically for the industrial uses of its products, including textiles, clothing, biodegradable plastic, food, biofuel, and medicine (including CBD). Hemp and its products are legal in the U.S. under the Farm Bill as long as they contain less than .3% THC.

CBD Isolate

These products are 99% CBD. To manufacture an isolate, everything contained in the plant matter is removed — including any traces of THC and other beneficial cannabinoids — until only a powder or crystalline form of CBD is left. This means that isolate users will not benefit from the entourage effect.

—M—

Marijuana

A general term that refers to female Cannabis sativa plants that produce flowers containing phytocannabinoids that are used for their medicinal and psychoactive properties.

Microdosing

A technique that involves consuming small servings of CBD supplements throughout the day. Microdosing can be beneficial because it allows the user to maintain stable CBD levels in your system around the clock. This consistency can be important for those who use CBD for its balancing properties.

—N—

Cesamet (nabilone) 

A synthetic cannabinoid prescribed for severe nausea and vomiting caused by cancer treatments like chemotherapy.

Nutraceutical

Also known as dietary supplements, these are food-derived products that offer extra health benefits in addition to their existing nutritional value. These products that contains nutrients derived from food products and are often concentrated in liquid, capsule, powder, or pill form. Dietary supplements are regulated by the FDA.

—O—

Organic

Foods and products derived from farming methods that promote ecological balance and restrict the use of pesticides, fertilizers, and synthetics. These growing practices promote the health of both the environment and the consumer. Organic products particularly appeal to those who support sustainable farming and care about the safety and quality of what goes into their bodies.

—P—

Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics 

The way drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and excreted in and from the body.

Phytocannabinoid

The chemical compounds in cannabis plants that mimic the endocannabinoids naturally produced by the body. CBD and THC are examples of phytocannabinoids, but there are at least 113 different phytocannabinoids in the cannabis plant, each producing unique effects in the body.

Potency

A measure of drug activity expressed in terms of the amount required to produce an effect of given intensity in the body. A high-potency drug evokes a larger response even at a low dose, while a low-potency drug evokes a small response at low concentrations and requires higher doses for a similar effect.

Psychoactive

A property that changes brain function by interacting with the central nervous system and results in altered perception, mood, consciousness, cognition, or behavior. THC is the primary psychoactive component in cannabis plants.

--R--

 

Route of administration 

The path by which a drug or substance is taken into the body. An example might be a medication that is taken in pill form (oral administration) or applied to the skin (topical application). 

—S—

Salve

An ointment made from the cannabis plant to be applied directly to the skin.

Schedule 1 drug 

Schedule 1 drugs are those that have no accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.

Strain

A cannabis plant bred for certain characteristics and use in medicinal, recreational, or industrial purposes. Industrial hemp, for example, is a strain bred to contain more CBD and less THC than other varieties, making it useful for medicinal products and legal under the Farm Bill.

Sublingual

From the Latin for “under the tongue,” a method for administering drugs by mouth. It involves placing a substance under the tongue, where it can be readily absorbed into the blood vessels and begin to circulate throughout the body.

Synthetic cannabis 

Synthetic cannabis, such as Spice and K2, refers to products using man-made chemicals. Some people may use synthetic cannabis as an alternative to marijuana. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warns that the effects of synthetic cannabis on the body can be unpredictable, harmful, and very different from those of marijuana.

—T—

Terpene

Aromatic oils that lend flavors such as berry, mint, and pine to different cannabis strains. More than 100 different terpenes have been identified, and every cannabis strain has its own terpene profile. The effects of any given terpene may be amplified in the presence of other compounds (also known as the entourage effect).

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) 

The main active psychoactive constituent of cannabis. It is responsible for the high sensation.

Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA)

A cannabinoid that does not have psychoactive effects. It is the precursor to THC. As the plant dries, THCA slowly converts to THC. The potential medicinal properties of THCA are still under study. 

Tincture

A delivery method, typically administered sublingually, that quickly absorbs and distributes throughout the body.

Topical

A delivery method where product is applied to the skin, typically as a salve or lotion, over the areas where they’re needed.

—V—

Vaporizer 

A device intended to vaporize substances for inhalation. Vaporizers can be used to heat dried cannabis, cannabis oil, or cannabis wax; they convert the active ingredients into a cannabis-infused aerosol that can be inhaled. 

 

Vaping 

Inhaling a vaporized substance generated by an electronic vaporizer.

Vertical integration

A business practice where a company owns its own supply chain. For example, owning the farms where hemp is grown, the barns where it’s stored, and the labs where it’s processed. This means that a vertically integrated company can ensure tighter quality control and maintain their core values and practices across all parts of the production process.

 

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